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The Origins Of Mental Illness And Extreme States

Love this by Dr. Dan L. Edmunds. In a world where the majority are unable to see the bigger picture and therefore have little compassion for extreme states and mental illness, this is exciting. Gives me great hope for change.

SG x

What is termed “madness” or “mental illness” is for some the only means for expression of their being lost and confused in a world which has caused them deep hurt and pain. Such is not disease but behavior with metaphorical meaning. There has been received through life mixed messages and placement into situations where regardless of the option they chose they felt damned. They seek to break out from the reality which has only caused them distress. The development of hallucinations and delusions are all metaphors for the very real demons they have encountered in a disordered society.

The inner mind, the voice within us, becomes amplified and becomes “possessed” with the demons coming forward from the trauma and distress which has been encountered. Rebellion against the system of things becomes self-destructive as the person seeks to send a message to the world of their distress, but it remains unheard. Each coping mechanism that has been employed has often led to failure and not brought them out of the unlivable situation that is their life. However, the catharsis of this pain and grief can go in two directions – it can be misery and existential death, or it can be transformative.

Through the pain and struggle, through the breaking out of the “typical reality” one can journey through various modes of altered consciousness. Many deemed “mad” speak of the supernatural. They have sought every attempt to reach out and create meaning. If they can be helped by a loving, supportive network to navigate through this state of confusion and the various realms of altered consciousness towards rebuilding and reconstructing a life of meaning, then they can come forward to a recovery that gives them valuable insight about human nature, who they really are, and the reality of the impermanence of this life and the world around us. They will find that suffering is inevitable, and in that suffering is the state of the world that is mired in greed and attachment. The ones deemed “mad” have accomplished a rare task – they have completely detached. But this detachment is only from the typical standards of the world. They remain haunted by the visions of their previous life.

They cannot escape it, and thus they become anxious and paranoid that something or someone will pull them back to that painful existence. At times, rage comes forward as the reaction to challenges, but who would not be outraged if their voice was suppressed and they became the scapegoat for the problems of their families or those around them? Those deemed “mad”, feeling always alone, depart to a world where they remain alone from people, yet may create for themselves beings who give them comfort and solace. This is really the end of their search, to simply be accepted and loved. But here too lies a problem, for when their lives have been devoid of love and they receive unconditional love, it becomes like an overwhelming fire that consumes them. They have never been loved, so how can they respond to an outpouring of love?

When all they knew was that oppression and coercion was said to be because “we love you”, when “love” really was only about control, how can the person then understand genuine love? Once again, the confusion sets in. To reach the person who has been deemed “mad”, we cannot overwhelm. Our sincerity will not be enough, for their trust has been shattered time and time again. It is only through entering their world for what it is, by joining in, and learning to speak the language of madness, that we ourselves can begin to understand the experience of these individuals. It is only by this joining in that the person may have the chance for the journey known as “madness” to reach a transformative movement towards discovery.

Dr. Dan L. Edmunds.

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PSYCHIATRY ALMOST DROVE ME CRAZY

 

Great article by Paul Levy (a pioneer in the field of spiritual emergence, and a healer in private practice) regarding psychiatric abuse (psychiatry’s invalidation of trauma and protection of the abuser). Psychiatry makes the sane ones.. the sick ones, the invalids (the in-valids).

SG x

I am a survivor of severe psychiatric abuse. There was a year or so in the early 1980’s when I was in and out of psychiatric hospitals at least four times. During my visits to the hospital I was in the midst of a spiritual awakening that I was struggling to contain that was triggered and complicated by extreme psychological abuse at the hands of my father, who was a very sick man. I was suffering so deeply from the psychic violence perpetrated upon my mother and me by my father that it was making me “sick.” One of the most difficult parts of my ordeal in the hospitals was not being listened to by the psychiatrists, either about the abuse by my father or the spiritual awakening. Spiritual emergences/emergencies oftentimes become activated because of a deep experience of wounding, abuse, or trauma. In its initial stage, a spiritual awakening can look like and mimic a nervous breakdown, as our habitual structures of holding ourselves together fall apart and break down so that a deeper and more coherent expression of our intrinsic wholeness can emerge. The spiritual awakening aspect of my experience was so off psychiatry’s map that it wasn’t even remotely recognized. Instead of hearing me, about either the abuse or the awakening, I was immediately pathologized and labeled as the sick one. Being cast in the role of the “identified patient,” I was assured that I was going to be mentally ill for the rest of my days, as if I was being given a life sentence with no possibility for parole, with no time off for good behavior. The fact that I wanted to dialogue about this and question their diagnosis was proof, to the psychiatrists in charge of me, of my illness. The whole thing was totally nuts. Fully licensed and certified by the state, the psychiatric system’s abuse of its position of power was truly unconscionable. What the profession of psychiatry was unconsciously en-acting was truly crazy-making for those under their dominion. I was lucky to escape the psychiatric world with my sanity intact. Many others are not so fortunate.

Continue reading

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The Real Cause Of Bipolar Disorder

This is good and easy to understand video by Sean Blackwell. I experienced a spiritual crisis/ transformation/ awakening 12 years ago. (more below..)

Check out this video. Worth the 9 mins. Tell me what you think..

Thrown into utter spiritual confusion

The crisis I had was sudden and started after doing yoga and eating clean. It was surreal, traumatising, terrifying, lasting for 14 days during which I was a constant state super heightened awareness/ intuition and having visions while awake. I was living alone at the time  .. thank goodness. I was staying in a hotel in my city.

I started manifesting my thoughts, seeing the historical past, archetypes, potential future in people, my life etc.. like a big screen movie projecting before me. It was huge, too much to explain really but I was so terrified by what I saw I couldn’t eat, digest and had emotional diarrh (let’s not mention that!!)

The visions stopped when I returned home to my family but I wasn’t the same I was unanchored by the experience. I keep relatively quiet about it, aside from those I thought could understand or at least not judge me. I’knew’ not to talk to my family about it, my father was a staunch atheist and would consider me crazy and my mother a staunch Catholic would consider me a heretic (yes, even in this age…) as parts of my visions did have some history relating to the Roman Catholic Church, the inquisition etc..

I was never hospitalized, nor did I take meds or talk to mainstream doctors purely because I didn’t trust them. I felt they were the last people that could help me in this spiritual state. I was lucky to have a friend to talk to that didn’t judge my crazy experiences.. Even though I didn’t understand what was happening and neither did she, at least I could express my utter confusion.. so grateful for her.

I was traumatized, deeply deeply confused, and out of body for a couple of years after the incident, and went on to have more experiences at a later date.

I now see it as transformational, my spiritual awakening and an amazing gift, and I’m so grateful I had some non threatening support. Shame it was just so intensely confusing on my mind!

It took me many years to understand it and integrate it, it took baby steps and lots of helpers along the way… some good, many not so good..

I went on to make some big changes in my life, left my 28 year relationship, healed my childhood and started to understand my historical trauma. I sussed out my gifts, simplified my life and let go of the people who stressed me out.

I am now starting to do the work that is important to me and my crisis pointed me in the direction.

SG x