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The Three Roles Of Victimhood

Okay, this is a must read for those from abusive/ dysfunctional families!!

I do find my predominant role in my family is the victim but sometimes I’ve been the rescuer … and lately, as I’ve expressed my anger.. (according to them.. ) I’m the perpetrator.

Read on, it’s enlightening!!

Love & baby steps,

SG x

The Drama Triangle

By Lynne Namka, Ed. D.

The three roles of the Drama Triangle are the three main positions that unhappy families play as described by transactional therapist, Stephen Karpman in 1968. The three roles are Perpetrator, rescuer and Victim that operate to keep people in the illusion of power. The roles incorporate learned patterns of habit and control mechanisms that bond people together in sick ways. They are symbiotic, destructive behaviors that affect all members of the family.

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Karpman Drama Triangle

Conflict Needs Players

Perpetrator . Victim  Rescuer 

Dr Stephen Karpman’s 1968 idea, was that conflict needs players and players need roles. The consequential objective of each role is just to have its own needs met – even if temporarily – in order to feel justified in its rationale/behaviour/feeling.

Karpman suggests that in each conflict there are three main roles:
  1. The Persecutor: happy to allocate blame and to ensure that other players know they are in the wrong. They are probably angry, accusative, inflexible and feeling very righteous. In order to have their needs met, they require The Victim; someone onto whom they can project their irritation.
  2. The Victim: The Victim takes the brunt of The Persecutor’s wrath. The Victim feels hard-done-by, got-at, powerless, ashamed, unable to do anything. This is obviously a position of anxiety for most, but psychologically it can actually often bring some comfort. You know where you are when you are The Victim, and it’s easy to seek the pity of others. If The Victim role feels natural to you, then you need to seek out The Persecutor (if you haven’t already got one) but also The Rescuer.
  3. The Rescuer: a big ball of guilt, who needs someone to help, because when you’re the hero to others then you don’t have to deal with your own feelings of anxiety or displacement. The Rescuer appears to be The Victim’s saviour from The Persecutor, but actually cements the others in their negative behaviours – almost giving them permission to stay as the bully or the bullied as it makes everyone feel that they have a purpose.

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The Knight Archetype

Knight . Rescuer . Warrior

Light Attributes

Loyalty, romance, and chivalry.

A love of honour

Shadow Attributes

Allegiance to a destructive ruler or principle.

Romantic delusions.

 The Knight archetype is primarily associated with chivalry, courtly romance, protection of the Princess, and going to battle only for honorable causes.

The Knight serves his King or Lord and so this archetype has spiritual overtones as well of service and devotion. Loyalty and self-sacrifice are the Knight’s great virtues, along with a natural ability to get things done.

A true Knight, like the Mystic, walks the fine line between self-sacrifice and self-neglect.

The Shadow Aspect

The Black Knight donning dark armor and riding a black horse represents the shadow characteristics of this archetype, especially the absence of honor and chivalry.

Somewhat like the Warrior, the shadow Knight manifests as loyalty to a questionable ruler or principle. In its negative aspect, the Knight can also, like the Rescuer, fall into a pattern of saving others but ignoring his own needs.

Evaluation

Look for a pattern of service to others that straddles the line between self-sacrifice and self-neglect.

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Movies portraying the ‘Knight Archetype’

Watching movies related to one of your core archetype especially when going through the process of healing your shadow aspect is a powerful tool to help you understand yourself (your motivations, your passions, your fears – why you behave the way you do).

SilverGirl