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Life-Giving Relationships

Relationships…when they are healthy and balanced, they can be life-giving and energizing. A supportive relationship, founded in love, whether it is romantic or friendship based, can offer an invigorating level of companionship and life-long support. In a balanced relationship, energy and is given back and forth, and grows — uplifting both people into their highest creativity.

However, when relationships lose their balance, the opposite energy flow occurs; each person feels short of energy and thus begins to try and force energy their way with criticism and control dramas. We all have experienced the feeling of weariness that comes when interpersonal hostility develops.

The solution is always the same. Each person must find their own inner source of security and inspiration, and then become fully conscious of when this connection is lost.

Just remember that we all have a spiritual download of Peace, Calm, and Inspiration (to do something with our lives) waiting for us. Once we find our inspired path, we can speak our truths in a loving and helpful way, without the need to dominate. In a relationship, our time should be spent supporting each others’ goals and dreams, and discussing the synchronicities that are guiding the way.

We become wiser together… and that’s what it’s all about

~ James Redfield

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Are You In Love, Or Just Attached?

Relationships that are based on control and unconscious drives and needs are codependent. The main indicator of codependency is focusing more attention on the actions and feelings of another person(s) than you do on yourself, and feeling that you have to control everything that happens. When your thoughts are dominated by what other people are doing, you are not, by definition, centered in your own inner process.

If your energy level fluctuates based on what others do or say, you might be codependent. If you feel like you have to monitor everything and make it work, you might be codependent. When you are struggling to control, you are not allowing the synchronicities of the universe to help you to develop.

~ James Redfield

http://themindsjournal.com/are-you-in-love-or-just-attached/

If you’re unsure about your own relationship motives, take a look at the following list and see where you land on love and attachment.
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Core Values In Relationships

Make-Or-Break Bonds

Core values. By Artist Karla Dornacher Karla is a neighbor, an inspiration, & a joy.:

I’ve been thinking about my core values in regards to relationships with others.

It gets difficult in a relationship when you have different values. For example some people don’t see the value in being kind.

Our values ultimately make or break our relationships. While breaking up can be very painful short term, in the long term it creates room for the kind of relationship you really want.

In my marriage, regarding beliefs, morals and values, I realized “the two of us were not only not on the same page, but we weren’t even in the same book.”

Eeek!

So what if you father doesn’t value fidelity and is constantly having affairs, or your son doesn’t value compassion and these are your core values? How do those relationships play out?

Here’s a list of some common core values.

What’s most important to you?

SG x

 

 

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Prince ‘Harming’ Syndrome

Prince Harming Syndrome

By Karen Salmansohn 30th July 2014

About a decade ago, I became involved with a guy I jokingly referred to as “a Romantrix.” Don’t bother Googling that term. I made it up to describe someone who dominates you so much with hot pursuit, that romance is inevitable.

This particular Romantrix inundated me with love letters, flowers, candle-lit dinners, and continuous promises to love me forever.

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The Vampire Archetype

Light Attribute

Makes you aware that something or someone is draining your life force.

Ability to hold your own energy.

Shadow Attribute

Depleting others for your psychic survival.

Chronic complaining and co-dependency.

The Vampire is a mythic creature associated with both blood-sucking and eroticism. Vampires require blood, which they get by biting the neck of their victims during a nocturnal visit.

The female victim has been portrayed in the paradoxical circumstances of wanting to repel the Vampire while at the same time welcoming the erotic nature of the connection. The Vampire returns every evening to his source of life until there is no more to be had.

The parallels between human lust and vampiric blood-lust are rich: as the Vampire satisfies his thirst for blood, his host grows increasingly helpless and submissive, eventually being drained of any capacity for self-protection.

Symbolically, this relationship speaks of the power dynamics that frequently drive male-female relationships, in which the male drains the power of the female for his own psychic survival, and, once bitten, the female submits even though this will eventually take all of her power. (In some relationships, of course, the roles can easily become reversed.)

Beyond the sexual level, we sometimes form psychic attachments to others because we desire their energy, a desire that manifests through a need for approval, a need to have the “other” take care of our survival, and a fear of being abandoned.

What has been defined as a co-dependent relationship could easily fall under the Vampire template.

You may find it hard to identify yourself as a Vampire, yet it is essential to review this archetype personally.

The Shadow Aspect

Patterns of behavior such as chronic complaining, over-dependency, holding on to a relationship emotionally or psychically long after it has ended, and chronic power struggles are all indicators of Vampire patterns. Holding onto someone on the psychic level is as real as holding on to them on the physical.

Interest in the Vampire archetype has re-emerged through the literary and entertainment fields. It may well be that the archetypal opening of humanity’s psyche during these past five decades has resurrected the Vampire, empowering it with a force on the psychic plane of consciousness that was not engaged prior to this time.

Evaluation

Look for a lifelong pattern of behaviour such as chronic complaining, over-dependency and holding onto relationships psychically long after they’ve ended.

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