0

Movie ~ Touched By Fire

Director and screenwriter, Paul Dalio’s new feature film takes a hard and gritty look at love, mania, creative inspiration, artistic temperament and making peace with bipolar.

Wow, looks interesting.

SG x

Touched with Fire stars Katie Holmes and Luke Kirby as two poets with bipolar disorder whose art is fueled by their emotional extremes. When they meet in a treatment facility, their chemistry is instant and intense driving each other’s mania to new heights. They pursue their passion which breaks outside the bounds of sanity, swinging them from fantastical highs to tormented lows until they ultimately must choose between sanity and love.

Inspired by the film maker’s own struggles overcoming bipolar disorder, Paul Dalio wrote, directed, edited and scored his feature film debut which also includes performances by Griffin Dunne, Christine Lahti and Bruce Altman.

(In cinemas February 12th 2016)

0

Common Defense Mechanisms

“ Attacking him triggers a defense mechanism. (GIF set) ”

In some areas of psychology (especially in psychodynamic theory), psychologists talk about “defense mechanisms,” or manners in which we behave or think in certain ways to better protect or “defend” ourselves. Defense mechanisms are one way of looking at how people distance themselves from a full awareness of unpleasant thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

Psychologists have categorized defense mechanisms based upon how primitive they are. The more primitive a defense mechanism, the less effective it works for a person over the long-term. However, more primitive defense mechanisms are usually very effective short-term, and hence are favored by many people and children especially (when such primitive defense mechanisms are first learned). Adults who don’t learn better ways of coping with stress or traumatic events in their lives will often resort to such primitive defense mechanisms as well.

Most defense mechanisms are fairly unconscious – that means most of us don’t realize we’re using them in the moment. Some types of psychotherapy can help a person become aware of what defense mechanisms they are using, how effective they are, and how to use less primitive and more effective mechanisms in the future.

Primitive Defense Mechanisms

1. Denial

OMGGGGG

Denial is the refusal to accept reality or fact, acting as if a painful event, thought or feeling did not exist. It is considered one of the most primitive of the defense mechanisms because it is characteristic of early childhood development. Many people use denial in their everyday lives to avoid dealing with painful feelings or areas of their life they don’t wish to admit. For instance, a person who is a functioning alcoholic will often simply deny they have a drinking problem, pointing to how well they function in their job and relationships.

2. Regression

Adult baby bouncer..this would be insanely comfortable haha

Regression is the reversion to an earlier stage of development in the face of unacceptable thoughts or impulses. For an example an adolescent who is overwhelmed with fear, anger and growing sexual impulses might become clingy and start exhibiting earlier childhood behaviors he has long since overcome, such as bedwetting. An adult may regress when under a great deal of stress, refusing to leave their bed and engage in normal, everyday activities.

3. Acting Out

Never. say. no. to. panda.

Acting Out is performing an extreme behavior in order to express thoughts or feelings the person feels incapable of otherwise expressing. Instead of saying, “I’m angry with you,” a person who acts out may instead throw a book at the person, or punch a hole through a wall. When a person acts out, it can act as a pressure release, and often helps the individual feel calmer and peaceful once again. For instance, a child’s temper tantrum is a form of acting out when he or she doesn’t get his or her way with a parent. Self-injury may also be a form of acting-out, expressing in physical pain what one cannot stand to feel emotionally.

4. Dissociation

A contemplative hedgehog. | 33 Animal GIFs That Are Guaranteed To Make You Laugh

Dissociation is when a person loses track of time and/or person, and instead finds another representation of their self in order to continue in the moment. A person who dissociates often loses track of time or themselves and their usual thought processes and memories. People who have a history of any kind of childhood abuse often suffer from some form of dissociation. In extreme cases, dissociation can lead to a person believing they have multiple selves (“multiple personality disorder”). People who use dissociation often have a disconnected view of themselves in their world. Time and their own self-image may not flow continuously, as it does for most people. In this manner, a person who dissociates can “disconnect” from the real world for a time, and live in a different world that is not cluttered with thoughts, feelings or memories that are unbearable.

5. Compartmentalization

Franz Joseph Gall - publishes work that suggests that the brain is functionally compartmentalized.  While correct in principle, his maps were totally incorrect.

Compartmentalization is a lesser form of dissociation, wherein parts of oneself are separated from awareness of other parts and behaving as if one had separate sets of values. An example might be an honest person who cheats on their income tax return and keeps their two value systems distinct and un-integrated while remaining unconscious of the cognitive dissonance.

6. Projection

Dan Bejar - "Future Vision"

Projection is the misattribution of a person’s undesired thoughts, feelings or impulses onto another person who does not have those thoughts, feelings or impulses. Projection is used especially when the thoughts are considered unacceptable for the person to express, or they feel completely ill at ease with having them. For example, a spouse may be angry at their significant other for not listening, when in fact it is the angry spouse who does not listen. Projection is often the result of a lack of insight and acknowledgement of one’s own motivations and feelings.

7. Reaction Formation

Being too Nice isn't always a good thing because that means you care too much even when they don't care about you

Reaction Formation is the converting of unwanted or dangerous thoughts, feelings or impulses into their opposites. For instance, a woman who is very angry with her boss and would like to quit her job may instead be overly kind and generous toward her boss and express a desire to keep working there forever. She is incapable of expressing the negative emotions of anger and unhappiness with her job, and instead becomes overly kind to publicly demonstrate her lack of anger and unhappiness.

0

Dissociative Disorders

 Dissociative Disorders: (A Medical Perspective)

As society has become increasingly aware of the prevalence of child abuse, trauma or neglect and its serious consequences, there has been an explosion of information on posttraumatic and dissociative disorders resulting from abuse or trauma in childhood. Since most clinicians learned little about childhood trauma and its aftereffects in their training, many are struggling to build their knowledge base and clinical skills to effectively treat survivors and their families.

Understanding dissociation and its relationship to trauma is basic to understanding the posttraumatic and dissociative disorders. Dissociation is the disconnection from full awareness of self, time, and/or external circumstances. It is a complex neuropsychological process. Dissociation exists along a continuum from normal everyday experiences to disorders that interfere with everyday functioning. Common examples of normal dissociation are highway hypnosis (a trance-like feeling that develops as the miles go by), “getting lost” in a book or a movie so that one loses a sense of passing time and surroundings, and daydreaming.

Researchers and clinicians believe that dissociation is a common, naturally occurring defense against childhood trauma. Children tend to dissociate more readily than adults. Faced with overwhelming abuse, it is not surprising that children would psychologically flee (dissociate) from full awareness of their experience. Dissociation may become a defensive pattern that persists into adulthood and can result in a full-fledged dissociative disorder.

The essential feature of dissociative disorders is a disturbance or alteration in the normally integrative functions of identity, memory, or consciousness. If the disturbance occurs primarily in memory, Dissociative Amnesia or Fugue (APA, 1994) results; important personal events cannot be recalled. Dissociative Amnesia with acute loss of memory may result from wartime trauma, a severe accident, or rape. Dissociative Fugue is indicated by not only loss of memory, but also travel to a new location and the assumption of a new identity. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), although not officially a dissociative disorder (it is classified as an anxiety disorder), can be thought of as part of the dissociative spectrum. In PTSD, recall/re-experiencing of the trauma (flashbacks) alternates with numbing (detachment or dissociation), and avoidance. Atypical dissociative disorders are classified as Dissociative Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS). If the disturbance occurs primarily in identity with parts of the self assuming separate identities, the resulting disorder is Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), formerly called Multiple Personality Disorder.

The Dissociative Spectrum

The dissociative spectrum (Braun, 1988) extends from normal dissociation to poly-fragmented DID. All of the disorders are trauma-based, and symptoms result from the habitual dissociation of traumatic memories. For example, a rape victim with Dissociative Amnesia may have no conscious memory of the attack, yet experience depression, numbness, and distress resulting from environmental stimuli such as colors, odors, sounds, and images that recall the traumatic experience. The dissociated memory is alive and active–not forgotten, merely submerged (Tasman & Goldfinger, 1991). Major studies have confirmed the traumatic origin of DID (Putnam, 1989, and Ross, 1989), which arises before the age of 12 (and often before age 5) as a result of severe physical, sexual, and/or emotional abuse. Poly-fragmented DID (involving over 100 personality states) may be the result of sadistic abuse by multiple perpetrators over an extended period of time.

Although DID is a common disorder (perhaps as common as one in 100) (Ross, 1989), the combination of PTSD-DDNOS is the most frequent diagnosis in survivors of childhood abuse. These survivors experience the flashbacks and intrusion of trauma memories, sometimes not until years after the childhood abuse, with dissociative experiences of distancing, “trancing out”, feeling unreal, the ability to ignore pain, and feeling as if they were looking at the world through a fog.

The symptom profile of adults who were abuse as children includes posttraumatic and dissociative disorders combined with depression, anxiety syndromes, and addictions. These symptoms include (1) recurrent depression; (2) anxiety, panic, and phobias; (3) anger and rage; (4) low self-esteem, and feeling damaged and/or worthless; (5) shame; (6) somatic pain syndromes (7) self-destructive thoughts and/or behavior; (8) substance abuse; (9) eating disorders: bulimia, anorexia, and compulsive overeating; (10) relationship and intimacy difficulties; (11) sexual dysfunction, including addictions and avoidance; (12) time loss, memory gaps, and a sense of unreality; (13) flashbacks, intrusive thoughts and images of trauma; (14) hypervigilance; (15) sleep disturbances: nightmares, insomnia, and sleepwalking; and (16) alternative states of consciousness or personalities.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of dissociative disorders starts with an awareness of the prevalence of childhood abuse and its relation to these clinical disorders with their complex symptomatology. A clinical interview, whether the client is male or female, should always include questions about significant childhood and adult trauma. The interview should include questions related to the above list of symptoms with a particular focus on dissociative experiences. Pertinent questions include those related to blackouts/time loss, disremembered behaviors, fugues, unexplained possessions, inexplicable changes in relationships, fluctuations in skills and knowledge, fragmentary recall of life history, spontaneous trances, enthrallment, spontaneous age regression, out-of-body experiences, and awareness of other parts of self (Loewenstein, 1991).

Structured diagnostic interviews such as the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) (Putnam, 1989), the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) (Ross, 1989), and the Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) (Steinberg, 1990) are now available for the assessment of dissociative disorders. This can result in more rapid and appropriate help for survivors. Dissociative disorders can also be diagnosed by the Diagnostic Drawing Series (DDS) (Mills & Cohen, 1993).

The diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of DID are (1) the existence within the person of two or more distinct personalities or personality states, each with its own relatively enduring pattern of perceiving, relating to, and thinking about the environment and self, (2) at least two of these personality states recurrently take full control of the person’s behavior, (3) the inability to recall important personal information that is to extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness, and (4) the disturbance is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (blackouts due to alcohol intoxication) or a general medical condition (APA, 1994). The clinician must, therefore, “meet” and observe the “switch process” between at least two personalities. The dissociative personality system usually includes a number of personality states (alter personalities) of varying ages (many are child alters) and of both sexes.

In the past, individuals with dissociative disorders were often in the mental health system for years before receiving an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. As clinicians become more skilled in the identification and treatment dissociative disorders, there should no longer be such delay.

Treatment

The heart of the treatment of dissociative disorders is long-term psychodynamic/cognitive psychotherapy facilitated by hypnotherapy. It is not uncommon for survivors to need three to five years of intensive therapy work. Setting the frame for the trauma work is the most important part of therapy. One cannot do trauma work without some destabilization, so the therapy starts with assessment and stabilization before any abreactive work (revisiting the trauma).

A careful assessment should cover the basic issues of history (what happened to you?), sense of self (how do you think/feel about yourself?), symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety, hypervigilance, rage, flashbacks, intrusive memories, inner voices, amnesias, numbing, nightmares, recurrent dreams), safety (of self, to and from others), relationship difficulties, substance abuse, eating disorders, family history (family of origin and current), social support system, and medical status.

After gathering important information, the therapist and client should jointly develop a plan for stabilization (Turkus, 1991). Treatment modalities should be carefully considered. These include individual psychotherapy, group therapy, expressive therapies (art, poetry, movement, psychodrama, music), family therapy (current family), psychoeducation, and pharmacotherapy. Hospital treatment may be necessary in some cases for a comprehensive assessment and stabilization. The Empowerment Model (Turkus, Cohen, & Courtois, 1991) for the treatment of survivors of childhood abuse–which can be adapted to outpatient treatment–uses ego-enhancing, progressive treatment to encourage the highest level of function (“how to keep your life together while doing the work”). The use of sequenced treatment using the above modalities for safe expression and processing of painful material within the structure of a therapeutic community of connectedness with healthy boundaries is particularly effective. Group experiences are critical to all survivors if they are to overcome the secrecy, shame, and isolation of survivorship.

Stabilization may include contracts to ensure physical and emotional safety and discussion before any disclosure or confrontation related to the abuse, and to prevent any precipitous stop in therapy. Physician consultants should be selected for medical needs or psychopharmacologic treatment. Antidepressant and antianxiety medications can be helpful adjunctive treatment for survivors, but they should be viewed as adjunctive to the psychotherapy, not as an alternative to it.

Developing a cognitive framework is also an essential part of stabilization. This involves sorting out how an abused child thinks and feels, undoing damaging self-concepts, and learning about what is “normal”. Stabilization is a time to learn how to ask for help and build support networks. The stabilization stage may take a year or longer–as much time as is necessary for the patient to move safely into the next phase of treatment.

If the dissociative disorder is DID, stabilization involves the survivor’s acceptance of the diagnosis and commitment to treatment. Diagnosis is in itself a crisis, and much work must be done to reframe DID as a creative survival tool (which it is) rather than a disease or stigma. The treatment frame for DID includes developing acceptance and respect for each alter as a part of the internal system. Each alter must be treated equally, whether it presents as a delightful child or an angry persecutor. Mapping of the dissociative personality system is the next step, followed by the work of internal dialogue and cooperation between alters. This is the critical stage in DID therapy, one that must be in place before trauma work begins. Communication and cooperation among the alters facilitates the gathering of ego strength that stabilizes the internal system, hence the whole person.

Revisiting and reworking the trauma is the next stage. This may involve abreactions, which can release pain and allow dissociated trauma back into the normal memory track. An abreaction might be described as the vivid re-experiencing of a traumatic event accompanied by the release of related emotion and the recovery of repressed or dissociated aspects of that event (Steele & Colrain, 1990). The retrieval of traumatic memories should be staged with planned abreactions. Hypnosis, when facilitated by a trained professional, is extremely useful in abreactive work to safely contain the abreaction and release the painful emotions more quickly. Some survivors may only be able to do abreactive work on an inpatient basis in a safe and supportive environment. In any setting, the work must be paced and contained to prevent retraumatization and to give the client a feeling of mastery. This means that the speed of the work must be carefully monitored, and the release painful material must be thoughtfully managed and controlled, so as not to be overwhelming. An abreaction of a person diagnosed with DID may involve a number of different alters, who must all participate in the work. The reworking of the trauma involves sharing the abuse story, undoing unnecessary shame and guilt, doing some anger work, and grieving. Grief work pertains to both the abuse and abandonment and the damage to one’s life. Throughout this mid-level work, there is integration of memories and, in DID, alternate personalities; the substitution of adult methods of coping for dissociation; and the learning of new life skills.

This leads into the final phase of the therapy work. There is continued processing of traumatic memories and cognitive distortions, and further letting go of shame. At the end of the grieving process, creative energy is released. The survivor can reclaim self-worth and personal power and rebuild life after so much focus on healing. There are often important life choices to be made about vocation and relationships at this time, as well as solidifying gains from treatment.

This is challenging and satisfying work for both survivors and therapists. The journey is painful, but the rewards are great. Successfully working through the healing journey can significantly impact a survivor’s life and philosophy. Coming through this intense, self-reflective process might lead one to discover a desire to contribute to society in a variety of vital ways.

by Joan A. Turkus, M.D.

1

Understanding Synchronicity

Beautiful Anime Art - Puzzles, an interesting idea I do love the aesthetic though.

What is Synchronicity?

The term synchronicity is coined by Carl Jung (a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology). It is about acausal connection of two or more psycho-physic phenomena.

 

Because our scientific worldview is built on the concept of cause and effect, as a culture we tend to doubt and deny aspects of experience that aren’t measurable and verifiable. So often when events coincide in startling ways, the first words we hear or say are, “Oh, it’s just a coincidence.”

Continue reading

1

Inertia: Psychological Sloth and Restlessness

Happy Sloth  Original Sloth Art PRINT 11 x 14 by CorinaStMartinArt, $22.00

I can’t tell you how many times people tell me, “I’m lazy;” and I never agree with them. Not because the evidence shows the contrary, but because I know there is a deeper reason for their inaction. There is wisdom in inertia. The question is – why has this individual’s psychic energy gone underground, why has it sunk into the unconscious? I don’t believe it is a choice to be active or not, one needs inner motivation to truly act. The question is – why has this individual’s light of awareness gone out leaving them victimized by their own unconscious impulses? It’s like they are half awake and half asleep simultaneously unable to partake in life.

Your not even a guy

Inertia has a biological purpose for all animals: to replenish one’s power. All warm-blooded animals require large amounts of sleep to replenish. In some animals, inertia is a self-protective move, i.e. like rabbits freezing and playing dead in the presence of a predator. But for humanity quiescence is not an appropriate response to life, nor is it an appropriate defense mechanism. The question is – what is it defending against?

In Christian theology sloth is one of the seven deadly sins. This moral judgment often causes more damage than we recognize to the poor soul sunk in inertia, for nothing saps one’s energy than the unfocused feeling of guilt. On the other hand, one could revolt against this moral judgment condoning his laziness as natural and harmless, believing he can rise from it when the time comes. However, that time often passes him by without stirring his soul to action.

An Ode To Sloths, AKA The Best Animal Living Today. I don't think you can get more hipster...

Psychologically, sloth represents a loss of psychic energy, of libido. Many times we find some poor soul pulling himself up by the bootstraps moving into some compulsive and useless activity to oppose his slothfulness, unfortunately this move does nothing to free him from his unconscious boundedness. “The inertia cannot be overcome simply by action, slot and restless activity are a pair of opposites that frequently alternate, without producing any improvement in the underlying situation” (Harding, 1947/1963, p. 45). After the individual has exhausted his little won psychic energy he falls back into slothfulness, losing self-esteem each time he swings from sloth to restlessness and back.

There are legitimate reasons for the withdrawal of psychic energy: emotional loss, physical illness, stress and anxiety, and psychological transformation. It is critical to recognize the deeper reason for inertia. For whatever reason when psychic energy is zapped it is not available for consciousness and the person has regressed to a lower level of functioning. When an individual loses a loved one, the loss dims one’s consciousness and they often become depressed. This is a legitimate reaction to loss. When an individual’s body becomes ill, all the energy in their system is needed for recovery which also depletes psychic energy. Stress and anxiety is most known for lowering one’s level of consciousness causing one to act out in very primitive and unconscious ways. Sometimes there is a legitimate reason for the stress and anxiety, but most often there is not. Finally, when a new level of consciousness is on the horizon psyche requires a time of rest allowing it to garner the necessary energy to transcend the present level of ego conscious into a new level of consciousness.

The question remains – what is the meaning of one’s laziness? Is she on the sea-saw of rest and restlessness never moving the ball forward? Is she suffering from an unresolved physical illness or emotional loss? Is her psyche preparing for a new birth? Or is she suffering from pathological inertia where no quantum of stimuli will unrest her soul into movement? In the latter case, the person has fallen into the dark mood of depression from which only the most drastic experience can rouse him. Perhaps even the desire for food has disappeared which is nature’s sharpest urge to overcome inertia. Or perhaps this individual has been disappointed in love, then nature’s second urge, sex, to overcome inertia has failed to do its job. Lastly, perhaps this individual is suffering from existential “emptiness.” Either way these people cannot take any adequate part in life.

That psychic energy is not within the privy of consciousness does not mean that it ceases to be; it still exists. A deficiency in psychic energy can mean: 1) it has fallen back into the unconscious; 2) or it never was available to ego consciousness, clinging to the depths of the unconscious. “One of the most important contributions that modern depth psychology has made towards the understanding of life is this principle of equivalence, which postulates that when energy disappears from one psychological manifestation it will reappear in another of equivalent value” (Harding, 1947/1963, p. 52). Psychic energy swimming, as it does, in the sea of unconsciousness often comes back in the form of new symptoms, peculiar dreams, or strange, fleeting fragments of fantasy. These manifestations often “form themselves into a symbolic image that contains the energy lost from consciousness, together with an additional amount of energy whose attracting power was responsible for the original loss” (p. 53). This symbols holds the clue to overcoming the impasse that has formed between consciousness and the unconscious. It only comes when the mind has exhausted its efforts to understanding the impasse.

When life presents us with a new problem, a new chapter of experience for which the old adaptation is inadequate, it is usual to experience a withdrawal of the libido. For one phase of life has come to an end, and that which is needed for the new is not immediately at hand. This withdrawal will be experienced in consciousness as a feeling of emptiness, often of depression, and certainly of inertia, with an overtone of self-rebuke because of what seems like laziness or sloth. (Harding, 1947/1963, p. 57)

This is what psychologists call regression in service of transcendence. Psychic energy sinks into the unconscious conjuring a symbol of transformation for consciousness to unravel.

Under these circumstances it is obviously necessary to accept without self-reproach the withdrawal of the libido from consciousness, and to concentrate one’s attention on the inner scene. This is the only way in which the lost energy can eventually be restored, and in which the capacity to take up the creative task of living can be renewed. (p. 58)

Source: blog.drbren.com

1

Why You Love Your Abuser..

Stockholm syndrome, or capture-bonding (trauma-bonding), is a psychological phenomenon in which victims express empathy and sympathy and have positive feelings toward their aggressors, sometimes to the point of defending and identifying with them. These feelings are generally considered irrational in light of the danger or risk endured by the victims, who essentially mistake a lack of abuse from their captors for an act of kindness. The FBI’s Hostage Barricade Database System shows that roughly 8% of victims show evidence of Stockholm syndrome.

Stockholm syndrome can be seen as a form of traumatic bonding, which does not necessarily require a hostage scenario, but which describes “strong emotional ties that develop between two persons where one person intermittently harasses, beats, threatens, abuses, or intimidates the other.”

One commonly used hypothesis to explain the effect of Stockholm syndrome is based on Freudian theory. It suggests that the bonding is the individual’s response to trauma in becoming a victim. Identifying with the aggressor is one way that the ego defends itself. When a victim believes the same values as the aggressor, they cease to be perceived as a threat. (wiki)

0

Gallery of Archetypes

Archetype -  click : http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp to take Carl Jung typology test, learn yourself :)

List of Archetypes

  • Addict (Conspicuous Consumer, Glutton, Workaholic — see also Gambler)
  • Advocate (Attorney, Defender, Legislator, Lobbyist, Environmentalist)
  • Alchemist (Wizard, Magician, Scientist, Inventor — see also Visionary)
  • Angel (Fairy Godmother/Godfather)
  • Artist (Artisan, Craftsperson, Sculptor, Weaver)
  • Athlete (Olympian)
  • Avenger (Avenging Angel, Saviour, Messiah)
  • Beggar (Homeless person/ Indigent)
  • Bully (Coward)
  • Child (Orphan, Wounded, Magical/Innocent, Nature, Divine, Puer/Puella Eternis, or Eternal Boy/Girl)
  • Child: Orphan
  • Child: Wounded
  • Child: Magical/Innocent
  • Child: Nature
  • Child: Puer/Puella Eternis (Eternal Boy/Girl)
  • Child: Divine
  • Clown (Court Jester, Fool, Dummling)
  • Companion (Friend, Sidekick, Right Arm, Consort)
  • Damsel (Princess)
  • Destroyer (Attila, Mad Scientist, Serial Killer, Spoiler)
  • Detective (Spy, Double Agent, Sleuth, Snoop, Sherlock Holmes, Private Investigator, Profiler — see also Warrior/Crime Fighter)
  • Dilettante (Amateur)
  • Don Juan (Casanova, Gigolo, Seducer, Sex Addict)
  • Engineer (Architect, Builder, Schemer)
  • Exorcist (Shaman)
  • Father (Patriarch, Progenitor)
  • Femme Fatale (Black Widow, Flirt, Siren, Circe, Seductress, Enchantress)
  • God (Adonis, see also Hero)
  • Goddess (see also Heroine)
  • Gossip (see also Networker)
  • Guide (Guru, Sage, Crone, Wise Woman, Spiritual Master, Evangelist, Preacher)
  • Healer (Wounded Healer, Intuitive Healer, Caregiver, Nurse, Therapist, Analyst, Counselor)
  • Wounded Healer
  • Hedonist (Bon Vivant, Chef, Gourmet, Gourmand, Sybarite — see also Mystic)
  • Hero/Heroine (see also Knight, Warrior)
  • Judge (Critic, Examiner, Mediator, Arbitrator)
  • King (Emperor, Ruler, Leader, Chief)
  • Knight (see also Warrior, Rescuer)
  • Liberator
  • Lover
  • Martyr
  • Mediator (Ambassador, Diplomat, Go-Between)
  • Mentor (Master, Counselor, Tutor)
  • Messiah (Redeemer, Saviour)
  • Midas/Miser
  • Monk/Nun (Celibate)
  • Mother (Matriarch, Mother Nature)
  • Mystic (Renunciate, Anchorite, Hermit)
  • Networker (Messenger, Herald, Courier, Journalist, Communicator)
  • Pioneer (Explorer, Settler, Pilgrim, Innovator)
  • Poet
  • Prince
  • Prostitute
  • Queen (Empress)
  • Rebel (Anarchist, Revolutionary, Political, Protester, Nonconformist, Pirate)
  • Rescuer
  • Saboteur
  • Samaritan
  • Scribe (Copyist, Secretary, Accountant — see also Journalist)
  • Seeker (Wanderer, Vagabond, Nomad)
  • Servant (Indentured Servant)
  • Shape-shifter (Spell-caster — see also Trickster)
  • Slave
  • Storyteller (Minstrel, Narrator)
  • Thief (Swindler, Con Artist, Pickpocket, Burglar, Robin Hood)
  • Trickster (Puck, Provocateur)
  • Vampire
  • Victim
  • Virgin (see also Celibate)
  • Visionary (Dreamer, Prophet, Seer — see also Guide, Alchemist)
  • Warrior (Soldier, Crime Fighter, Amazon, Mercenary, Soldier of Fortune, Gunslinger, Samurai)

 myss.com

0

The Martyr Archetype

Light Attribute

Learning the transcendent nature of service to oneself or a cause.

Shadow Attribute

Addiction to self pity.

The Martyr archetype is well known in two arenas: as a classic political or religious figure, and in the self-help world of contemporary psychology.

In the social and political world, the martyr is often highly respected for having the courage of conviction to represent a cause, even if it requires dying for that cause for the sake of others.

Suffering so that others might be redeemed, whether that redemption take a spiritual or political form, is among the most sacred of human acts.

The Shadow Aspect

Within the self-help field, the shadow Martyr is viewed as a person who has learned to utilize a combination of service and suffering for others as the primary means of controlling and manipulating her environment and an addiction to self pity.

Evaluation

While people recognize this archetype in others, particularly when they are directly influenced by the individual sporting this pattern, they often cannot see it in themselves.

Look for a pattern of giving yourself to causes for the betterment of others, regardless of the consequences.

myss.com

 Movies with Martyrs

Watching movies related to one of your core archetypes, especially when going through the process of healing your shadow aspect is a powerful tool to help you understand yourself (your motivations, your passions, your fears – why you behave the way you do).

Healing the Negative Aspect or Shadow Side of the Martyr

Shadow Martyrs tend to be run down, sick, bitter and miserable before they wake up and realize that their life isn’t working for them.

It is probably working for everyone else around them though!

On a spiritual level the answer lies in choosing life and happiness, rather than choosing suffering and unhappiness.

Lessons in self love – taking care of your own needs first, in order to give and to be of benefit to someone else.

Selflessness vs. Selfishness

Assertiveness – learning to say no to others in order to say yes to yourself

Consider counselling or talk therapy to overcome issues:

Forgoing your own needs leads to ill health, victimization, blaming others, bitterness and resentment.

People do not respect those who do not take care of themselves first no matter how kind and loving they are.

Issues to Address

Your fears regarding creating a happy life for yourself – devoid of endless suffering

Learning to take care of yourself: emotionally, physically and spiritually

Being responsible for your own well being

Self Esteem

Learning healthy narcissism

Addressing childhood and/or past life issues regarding martyrdom.

Self Love

Learning how to set firm boundaries with people.

Removing the takers and selfish people from your life.

Developing the courage to take the action required to create your own happy life, free of pain, suffering and resentment.


Ask yourself this question when you choose to ‘help others’ or give to others especially when you yourself are stressed, run down or overtired.

Is this good for me?

“What do I need?”

and also remember…  

those that love you, want you to be happy and free of stress

…not miserable because you give endlessly until you are burnt out and exhausted.

That is not called love – that is called martyrdom.

Healing Quotes

Silver Girl

0

Indigo = Intuition & Perception

Colour Psychology – Indigo!

Third Eye Chakra – I see

Intuition: use it to assist in accessing intuitive abilities – it is the first step to higher spiritual knowledge

Integrity: and deep sincerity are qualities of indigo

Structure and Order: a good colour to use in restructuring aspects of your life or business

Wisdom: an inner knowingness and awareness – spiritual wisdom rather than the wisdom of the intellect

The color indigo is the color of intuition and perception and is helpful in opening the third eye. It promotes deep concentration during times of introspection and meditation, helping you achieve deeper levels of consciousness. It is a color which relates to the “New Age” – the ability to use the Higher Mind to see beyond the normal senses with great powers of perception. It relies on intuition rather than gut feeling.

Indigo is a deep midnight blue. It is a combination of deep blue and violet and holds the attributes of both these colors.

Service to humanity is one of the strengths of the color indigo. Powerful and dignified, indigo conveys integrity and deep sincerity.

The color meaning of indigo reflects great devotion, wisdom and justice along with fairness and impartiality. It is a defender of people’s rights to the end.

Structure creates identity and meaning for indigo. In fact an indigo person cannot function without structure – it throws them right off balance. Organization is very important to them and they can be quite inflexible when it comes to order in their lives.

Positive keywords include integrity and sincerity, structure and regulations, highly responsible, idealism, obedience, highly intuitive, practical visionary, faithful, devotion to the truth and selflessness.

Negative keywords include being fanatical, judgmental, impractical, intolerant and inconsiderate, depressed, fearful, self-righteous, a conformist, addictive, bigoted and avoiding conflict.

Add a little indigo to your life today!

Extract from: Empower Yourself with Colour Psychology