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Own our history. Change the story

BB_ChurchStory2This post was written by author and researcher Brene Brown. It is regarding the recent shootings in Charleston. It is about owning our history and changing the story.

This post comes at the right time for me as I’ve been thinking a great deal about my own ancestral history and story, particularly the continuing cycle of poor communication and emotional abuse that runs through the veins of my family tree.

My family needs to own this story, stop burying their head in the sand and change it, and break the cycle for good.

It may have to be me who has the courage to speak the truth about ‘our story’, our continuing cycle of abuse …without blaming or shaming.

This is good stuff.. have a read

Love & baby steps 

SG x

By Author Brene Brown

When we deny our stories, they define us.

When we own our stories, we get to write a brave new ending.

I know this is true. I may have learned it as a researcher but I live this truth as a daughter, a partner, a leader, a sister, a mother, and a friend. When we push down hurt or pretend that struggle doesn’t exist, the hurt and struggle own us.

I’ve learned that writing a brave new ending means:

  1. We can’t smooth over hurt feelings in our families. It’s too easy for stockpiled hurt to turn into rage, resentment, and isolation. We must talk about it. Even when we don’t want to. Even when we’re tired.
  2. We can’t pretend our family histories of addiction and mental health issues don’t exist if our hope is to write a new story and pass that legacy of emotional honesty and health down to our children.
  3. We must own our failures and mistakes so that we can learn and grow. It’s hard but I’ve seen how it becomes part of a family and organizational cultures and unleashes innovation and creativity. It doesn’t feel comfortable, but courage rarely does.

Owning our stories is standing in our truth. It’s critical and transformative in our personal and professional lives. It’s also critical in our community lives.

Until we find a way to own our collective stories around racism in this country, our history and the stories of pain will own us.

We will not get away from the violence and heartbreak. Fear and scarcity will continue to run roughshod over our country. Yes, the violence in Charleston is also about access to guns and, more than likely, mental illness. But it’s also about race.

Our collective stories of race in the US are not easy to own. They are stories of slavery, violence, and systemic dehumanization. We will have to choose courage over comfort. We will have to feel our way through the shame and sorrow. We will have to listen. We will have challenge our resistance and our defensiveness.

We have to keep listening even when we want to scream, “I’m not that way. This isn’t my fault!”

We have to examine and own stereotypes and prejudices. Every single one of us has them. It will be tough.

We will need to sit down with our children and talk about privilege. This means honest conversations about how we were raised and what we need to work on. No blaming or shaming, but truth. It’s not productive to deny how hard we all work for what we have, but it’s not honest to deny that many of us are afforded privileges based on who we are and what we look like.

Will these conversations stop violent hate crimes? No one knows for sure, but we shouldn’t underestimate the power of love and truth-telling.

This is not bigger than us. This is us.

Yes, we need to own a million heartbreaking stories of discrimination and prejudice, and make millions of changes, and hold space for a million tough conversations. But, if each one of us owns one story and makes one change and has one honest conversation where we listen more than defend or offer false comfort – we can do this. There is a way to write a brave new ending to one of the most painful stories in our history. What remains to be seen is if we have the will and courage.

I believe we do.

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Past Life Regression – Does History Repeat Itself?

When traditional therapy and western medicine are unable to bring about the answers to these questions, some people are turning to Past Life Regression.
Past Life Regression is the process of utilizing hypnosis to explore a past life. There is a growing interest in Past Life Regression Therapy, as evidenced by the exposure and popularity of authors such as Brian Weiss.

Aside from curiosity, why explore past lives at all? The poet and philosopher George Santayana stated “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” While most of us in general do not remember all or any of our past lives while in waking consciousness, we can access those past lives under hypnosis to assist us with our current life lessons.

Of the clients I see, the most common reason that people come for a past life regression is to explore the root cause of an issue that can’t be traced to any event in the current lifetime. Many people also come for further understanding of relationships with key people in their lives, like family members or romantic partnerships.

In fact, past life regression has a number of valuable therapeutic purposes.

Cycles of Behavior – Viewing the cycles and patterns of behavior recurring throughout many lifetimes grants greater perspective on our unique quirks, habits, struggles, fears, choices, hopes and dreams.

Physical Healing – In many cases, the health issues we experience in this life have roots that extend into other lifetimes. For this reason, past life regression can provide information important to healing physical symptoms.

Unexplained Pain – Unexplained pains and syndromes, chronic pain and illness, birthmarks, and other health-related phenomena frequently have their roots in other lifetimes.

Phobias – A regression can also reveal the roots of phobias or other emotional blocks. Sometimes simply having knowledge of the relevant past life experience will be enough to shift the energy, allowing a breakthrough or healing to occur.

There are many other often unexpected benefits including:

Overcoming the fear of death. If you experienced death and knew for certain that you lived on, would you still be afraid?

Staying connected to our loved ones. Experiencing crossing over affirms the continuity of life. One of the hardest things about death is losing the connection and presence of those whom we love. One of my happiest sessions was with a client who had recently lost a child. To experience a former lifetime with this child’s soul and to know that they will meet again was so healing for this client. There is so much reassurance and relief to see our loved ones there on the other side and to know we have not truly lost them.

Discovering your inner strength. All souls have lived at least a few (usually many) difficult lives. Sometimes we suffer. When you re-experience prior struggles and come to realize that you have survived so much already, current challenges become more bearable. You recognize that “this too shall pass.”

Tapping into your inner wisdom. Even in our present life, the intensity of a lesson can fade with time. Revisiting past life events can awaken hard-earned yet buried wisdom. As you connect with and integrate all the pieces of your whole self, you can reclaim greater energy and awareness.

Accessing skills and abilities from former lives. You have transferable skills from your past life. You do not lose the talents developed or awareness gained from former lives. Sometimes these talents can be active at an early age, in which case society might label this child a prodigy or a genius. Other times these skills might lie dormant and can be triggered through reliving past life experiences.

WHAT IS A PAST LIFE REGRESSION SESSION LIKE?

In a typical past life regression session, you will be guided into a deep relaxation. The practitioner will assist you in mentally relaxing your whole body and then focusing inward. There are many methods and imagery for getting you back to the past life, such as stairs or a hallway or tunnel. In general, you are given a suggestion to go back to a lifetime which is relevant to the issues you are currently facing.

You then visit a few key experiences in that lifetime, as well as the death scene. After the death scene you can review what was gained from that lifetime and how it can assist you in your current life. After the session you will usually remember everything. Some practitioners also provide recordings of your session for later review.

OTHER WAYS TO RECALL YOUR PAST LIVES

If you don’t have access to a past life regressionist in your area, you can work on uncovering your past lives by yourself with these methods:

Self-hypnosis – You can do record yourself reading a past life regression script and play it back

Dreaming – You can direct your consciousness to deliver you a past life memory through your dream. Everything you’ve ever experienced is stored in your consciousness. Your conscious mind which focuses on the outer world blocks most of this information while you’re awake so that you can focus and function in your everyday life. At night the filter from your conscious mind rests while you sleep and you are more receptive to the messages of your subconscious and superconscious minds. Simply hold the intention to remember a past life as you fall asleep. Leave a notepad and a pen next to your bed and record your dream first thing in the morning.
naturally taps into your whole self and facilitates greater awareness. Meditating on a regular basis seems to stimulate spontaneous past life recall in some people.

Source: Tianna Roser is a Certified Clinical Hypnotist. She received her Hypnosis and Past Life Regression training with HCH Institute, a California state-approved school for Hypnotherapy and is also certified by the National Guild of Hypnotists. Tianna also completed training for Life Between Lives Regression with the Michael Newton Institute for Spiritual Regression.

 

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The Poet Archetype

Poet . Lyricist . Poet/ Musician . Troubadour . Singer/ Songwriter

Light: 

Expresses soul insights in symbolic language.

Shadow:

Turns a lyric gift to negative or destructive effect.

Closely related to both the Author and the Artist, the Poet combines lyricism with sharp insight, finding the essence of beauty and truth not only in the great epic affairs of humanity, but also in everyday acts and objects.

Great poetry extolls momentous events and great deeds, and also expresses wonder at the hidden joys and sorrows that most of us might overlook.

 The Shadow Aspect

The shadow Poet turns his gift for lyricism to negative or destructive effect, as in songs or poems written in support of military aggression or genocide.

Evaluation

You don’t have to be a published poet to have this as one of your twelve archetypes.

Look for a lifetime need and ability to discover beauty in the people and things around you, and express it in a way that helps others see it, too.

Religion/Myth

King David (ruler of Israel credited with writing many of the Psalms);

Orpheus (great musician and poet of Greek myth, capable of charming wild beasts);

Bragi (in Norse myth, the god of eloquence and patron of poets);

Finn Mac Cumhail (legendary Irish hero and leader who was also greatly skilled as a poet).

 myss.com

 Movies with Poet Archetypes

Watching movies related to one of your core archetypes, especially when going through the process of healing your shadow aspect is a powerful tool to help you understand yourself (your motivations, your passions, your fears – why you behave the way you do).

SilverGirl