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Changing Our Limited Beliefs About Autism

Autistic Girl Expresses Unimaginable Intelligence

About 10 years ago I used to help out an autistic boy at my son’s school. I became very aware of how highly intuitive he was. He often heard and saw things that I couldn’t hear or see .. and I remember how excited he got when he sensed the school cat had entered the classroom… (he could be facing the other direction but could sense the cat’s energy every time – never had to see it with his eyes..)

The minute I met him he came right up to my face (nose to nose) and stared directly into my eyes – I felt like he was downloading my soul :o). The other women said they had never seen him do that to anyone else.

I am a highly intuitive person and I suffer from sensory overload, often it is much easier for me to be alone than to be with people especially new people.

I feel energy and often feel/ sense and know too much, that it causes me pain.

I can’t imagine how hard it is to be autistic, they seem to be antennae for everything ..

I find this short clip amazing. What a father this girl has <3

 It will make you rethink autism

Enjoy

SG x

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Your Elusive Creative Genie/ Genius

Writers, Poets, Artists, Creatives

Creativity and Depression/ Mental Illness

Why do so many poets, artists, writers and creatives suffer from mental anguish/  illness?

This is a great video!

Love this talk from Elizabeth Gilbert (writer). Actually I love everything Elizabeth Gilbert does, fullstop. Answering the question – where does your creativity come from? Is it in you.. or does it work through you, or both. This interesting and entertaining video is approx. 20 minutes long but well worth the watch..

Enjoy .. SilverGirl x

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The Marketing Of Madness – Part One (9 mins)

Are we all insane? 

Documenting the impact of a multibillion dollar psychiatric-pharmaceutical industry, this powerful and graphic video contains interviews with experts, parents and victims.
This is the story of the high-income partnership between drug companies and psychiatry which has created an $80 billion profit from the peddling of psychotropic drugs to an unsuspecting public.
But appearances are deceiving.
How valid are psychiatrist’s diagnosis—and how safe are their drugs?

Digging deep beneath the corporate veneer, this is part of the three-part documentary (I’ll add more).. which exposes the truth behind the slick marketing schemes and scientific deceit that conceal a dangerous and often deadly sales campaign.

Psychiatrists tell us that the way to fix unwanted behavior is by altering brain chemistry with a pill.
But unlike a mainstream medical drug like insulin, psychotropic medications have no measurable target illness to correct, and can upset the very delicate balance of chemical processes the body needs to run smoothly.
Nevertheless, psychiatrists and drug companies have used these drugs to create a huge and lucrative market niche.
And they’ve done this by naming more and more unwanted behaviors as “medical disorders” requiring psychiatric medication.

But should these really be called diseases?

So the question is:
How did psychotropic drugs, with no target illness, no known curative powers and a long and extensive list of side effects, become the go to treatment for every kind of psychological distress?
And how did the psychiatrists espousing these drugs come to dominate the field of mental treatment?
Psychiatrists claim a history of great advances in the area of psychotropic drugs. But is this parade of brain chemicals the “scientific breakthroughs” they assert?
Sigmund Freud’s early drug marketing efforts helped create a major cocaine epidemic throughout Europe.
Psychiatrists next turned to amphetamines until those drugs were discovered to be not only ineffective, but highly toxic and addictive.
Years later, the world was told that “antidepressant” drugs were actually “lifestyle drugs” for a choose your mood society. Yet within ten years, staggering details of side effects such as violence and suicide could no longer be ignored—with an estimated 3.9 million adverse events on Prozac alone.
Today, the same cycle continues, with breathless news coverage of new chemical treatments promoted as “miracle drugs.”
Two questions remain—where is the science that backs psychiatry up?
And how much longer will the public continue to believe false hopes, hype and outright lies?